Before the 20th Century, scientists were willing to put their lives on the line to prove their discoveries. Prior to the turn of that century, Madame Marie Curie had started experimenting with radium and exposing herself to radioactivity during the late 1800s. The accumulation of radioactive toxicity over her life created the type of leukemia that killed her after she had turned 67 in 1934.

Earlier, around 1831, Pharmacist P.F. Touery, pulled a daring stunt in front of an audience of fellow scientists at The French Academy of Medicine by drinking a massive dose of lethal strychnine in front of them. Amazingly, he suffered no toxic effects.
He had combined the deadly poison with activated charcoal, an antidote and detoxifying agent that goes back centuries.

Today, activated charcoal is in most hospital ERs and many emergency vehicles as a fast, effective antidote for poisons of all types. It is considered safe and effective by the FDA, and it’s inexpensive. Very few know of this amazing natural antidote, and even less know of its general detoxifying capacity. And it can be used to whiten teeth better than anything.

1Explaining Activated Charcoal

Don’t confuse activated charcoal with charcoal briquettes for barbecuing or anything else. Those contain toxic chemicals and carcinogens. Using the powder form of activated charcoal is what’s recommended. It’s easy to ingest as a fine powder in water. It’s tasteless, though a tad gritty.

It is derived from burning pure, untainted organic substances, such as coconuts or certain woods, without using chemicals in the process. You can get a one pound bag for around $10.00 US.

Dr. Al Sears, MD, has his patients use it for detoxing even heavy metals, and he uses it himself. For heavy metal detoxifying, he recommends a total of 20 grams per day, spaced apart in two to four doses, over a 12 day period.

The action of activated charcoal involves adsorption, not absorption, of toxins from the intestinal tract. Adsorption is the electrical attraction of toxins to the surfaces of the fine charcoal particles. The charcoal itself is not absorbed into the body, so the toxins attached to the charcoal particles exit via the bowels. Don’t be surprised by black stools.

Some advise using it with a non-toxic toothpaste to remove plaques and stains from your teeth as well as bacteria from your mouth. A bit messy, perhaps, but considered highly effective for cleaning and sanitizing.

Back